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Posts Tagged ‘curiosity’

In my new library job I am doing some copy cataloging, which is great fun. It also contributes to my “to read” list, because I inevitably see a book on my cart that interests me. That is how I found The End of the Rainbow: How Educating for HAPPINESS (Not Money) Would Transform Our Schools by Susan Engel.

I LOVED this book. I’ll grant that I was primed to — longtime readers of bookconscious know that when I started the blog, it was about what my life learning family was reading. Back then, neither of our kids had ever been to formal schooling. John Holt had a lot to do with that. When I first learned about home education (by helping a library patron find books on the topic when I was pregnant with our older child), Holt’s work was life changing. What Holt wrote about is that children are born learners, who don’t need educational bureaucracies, metrics, curriculums, or even schools necessarily. What they need is adults who take them seriously, who respect their interests, and who give them the time and space to pursue those interests.

In The End of the Rainbow Engel quotes Holt and other educators and philosophers who embrace these ideas about children and how they learn. And she does something I wasn’t expecting — paints a very clear picture of what these ideas would look like in a public school. Any public school. In towns or cities, urban or rural places, with rich or poor kids. I quoted the book on Litsy as I was reading: “A premium on conformity and obedience has left little room for teaching children something much more powerful: the ability to find activities that are compelling, or to find what is compelling in a task, and thus find a way to be deeply absorbed.”

Engel’s call is to stop valuing conformity and start letting kids live their naturally learning-centered lives. She posits that if our education system was aimed at producing happy, well adjusted adults capable of thinking and pursuing ideas, rather than uniformly prepared workers ready for the workforce, both school and society would be better off.

One thing I hadn’t thought of until I read this book is that school is distracting — we actively encourage kids to change the subject several times a day, to move on whether something is done or not, and to work quickly. All the talk of our national inability to focus? Maybe it’s partially caused by school itself. One of our library liaisons heard faculty recently lament in a meeting that college students just want a rubric so they know what effort they need to make for an A, B, or C, and that they don’t try to think. I think Engel’s perspective might be that many college students have dealt with nothing but rubrics for the twelve years prior, and they’ve never been invited to think about doing things any other way.

Engel suggests that rather than standardized tests, which she notes have not been proven to be useful, schools could use many of the tools developmental psychologists employ to observe children’s (and their schools’) aptitudes in several key areas that would promote well being and a successful transition to adulthood. Such tools would include observing classrooms via videotape at random. Her “Blueprint for Well-Being” would ensure every child can have conversations, read for pleasure and information, collaborate and cooperate, investigate, “be useful,” “get immersed,” “become an expert” at something, and “know and be known by an adult.”

Most schools would have to change to allow these skills to be paramount. Engel notes that making room for teaching such attributes would mean simplifying school days, being intentional about schools as communities (including ensuring adults actively and positively engage with children so that they learn how to treat each other, and how to depend on one another so that differences become less important), allowing both teachers and students some autonomy, and ensuring teachers’ well being and happiness in their work, so that they have the energy and enthusiasm necessary to promote these attributes in their classrooms.

What an amazing world we’d have if every kid had these experiences! Some of the examples of classes she observed, both horrible and wonderful, made me want to start a school that embodies all of these principles and goals.Looking around at the pain society is experiencing right now, I wonder the kind of schools Engel envisions, places where competent, caring adults affirm and uphold the humanity, dignity, and natural curiosity of every child couldn’t just be the seismic shift we need? But could we get there with so many adults who are products themselves of our current school system, which Engel notes contributes to the mistrust many adults have of their own ability, each other and authority?

The End of the Rainbow is an amazing read, full of big ideas and thoughtful consideration of what society should want for it’s young people, interesting and important stuff even if you don’t have kids in school. Engel’s writing style is very persuasive. I’m grateful it was on my cataloging cart!

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