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Posts Tagged ‘The Mindful Reader column’

New Hampshire is teeming with excellent writers, but there are few who are as consistently interesting and eloquent as Sy Montgomery. I review her latest book in The Mindful Reader column this week.

Here’s the beginning:

If you haven’t read New Hampshire author Sy Montgomery’s many books on the natural world, her latest, “The Soul of An Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness,” is a good place to start. Just as with her earlier work, Montgomery’s passion for other species is infectious – if you’ve never given octopuses much thought before, you will after reading this book.

Read the rest here.

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In this edition of The Mindful Reader I review Vermonter Barry Estabrook‘s Pig Tales: an Omnivore’s Quest for Sustainable Meat and Maine author Jessica Peill-Meininghaus‘s The Gnome Project: One Woman’s Wild and Woolly Adventure. Here’s a bit of the beginning of the column:

Vermonter Barry Estabrook isn’t a vegetarian, but his new book “Pig Tales: An Omnivore’s Quest for Sustainable Meat” might put readers off pork.

From Iowa to the Ozarks, Colorado to North Carolina, upstate New York to Denmark, Estabrook visits pig farms. He interviews slaughterhouse workers, farm hands and USDA inspectors, people living near industrial hog farms, lawyers, academics, and writers, including New Hampshire’s own Sy Montgomery. What he learns will astonish and possibly disgust readers.

You can read the rest here.

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In today’s New Hampshire Sunday News I review two New Hampshire authors — both prolific, both excellent in their genres — Jeremy Robinson, who writes what I think of as sci-fi thrillers with a dash of political intrigue, and Margaret Porter, whose historical novels are richly detailed.

Their new books are MirrorWorld, a thought provoking page turner set right here in New Hampshire and A Pledge of Better Times, about real members of the British royal court in the late 1600’s and early 1700’s, a real treat for Masterpiece fans and history buffs. Here’s the beginning of the column:

NH writers spin altered reality of two sorts

Jeremy Robinson’s new thriller “MirrorWorld,” which comes out this week, is set mostly in New Hampshire, but not necessarily the one we know.

Josef Shiloh, former special forces soldier and CIA assassin, knows himself only as Crazy. He can’t remember anything about his life or identity and he is quite literally fearless; it’s an emotion as unknown to him as his past.

A woman appears at the mental hospital where he lives, offers him a chance to leave and takes him to a mysterious company called Neuro.

He finds out that Neuro exists to counter a race of mythical creatures called the Dread that have co-existed with humans since the dawn of time and are the source of terror and violence in the world.

– See more at: http://www.unionleader.com/article/20150426/OPINION02/150429344/0/SEARCH#sthash.JPLUvhU4.dpuf

 

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In today’s column I review Lily Brooks-Dalton’s memoir Motorcycles I’ve Loved. Here’s a bit of the beginning:

It’s spring in New England, which means motorcycle engines are roaring back to life after a long winter. I’ve never been on a motorcycle, and I admit to being a little afraid of them, but Lily Brooks-Dalton’s memoir, “Motorcycles I’ve Loved,” helped me see them in a different light.

You can read the rest here, for free. When I checked this morning, my column was one of the rotating front page stories, which is pretty cool! I also read this inspiring piece about a woman who lost her son to PTSD and suicide after he came home from Iraq who has started a nonprofit that helps veterans adopt shelter pets. Reading that made my morning — Jo-Ann Clark is an amazing woman, to turn a personal tragedy into hope for others.

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The title of my blog post is the New Hampshire Sunday News headline for my column today. You can read it here for free. This week I review Boston author Nina MacLaughlin’s Hammer Head: the Making of a Carpenter, which is a terrific read and a really thought provoking look at the value of making tangible things instead of — ahem — stuff people read online.  If you know anyone about to graduate and confused about what to do, this would be a good gift.

I also review New Hampshire native Meredith Tate’s “dystopian New Adult romance,” Missing Pieces, which is also thought provoking in its own way, and fun to read.

Take the link and thanks for reading!

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In today’s Mindful Reader column in the New Hampshire Sunday News I review Holly LeCraw’s The Half Brother and Dr. H. Gilbert Welch’s Less Medicine, More Health.

I found LeCraw’s novel complex and original, and if you or someone you love has recently been diagnosed with a chronic or serious condition or is approaching retirement, Dr. Welch’s book is eye opening and thought provoking.

Take the link (it’s free) and thank you for reading!

 

 

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The Mindful Reader ran in the New Hampshire Sunday News today. Good news for longtime readers: you can take a link to the paper and read the article for free, with no restrictions on how many times you can visit the site in a month. Which is good, because the column will appear every other Sunday.

Here’s this week’s lead, so I can entice you a bit:

“I
n the acknowledgements of his book “Wide-Open World: How Volunteering Around the Globe Changed One Family’s Lives Forever,” John Marshall thanks his ninth-grade English teacher at Manchester High School Central, Mrs. Singer, in whose class he says “a whole new world opened up for me” which led to his becoming a writer. We can all be grateful to Mrs. Singer, because Marshall’s memoir is an interesting, inspiring read. ”

I also review SNUH MFA grad Kenneth Butler’s debut novel Holy Fool. Take the link. Check out the column. Let me know what you think!

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